Tag Archives: abuses of psychiatry

The Blessed Hope

Our article today is “The Blessed Hope.” Today we continue our series of articles that God has given us everything we need for life and godliness. As we fast approach the end of days the stress on all of humanity is increasing exponentially. This stress caused in large part by the intensity of natural disasters is having a profound effect on the human psyche causing many to lose hope. Hopelessness has trapped many into a life of endless psychological counseling and psychiatric drug addiction, while many others have turned to a life of crime in an attempt to recoup their losses. I am afraid we are just seeing the tip of the iceberg with strange and erratic behavior with a growing sense of hopelessness to contain it. From individuals eating the face off another individual to running head long into traffic, almost no one is pointing their finger at the increasing demonic influence on humanity. If that were not enough, very many people are losing hope in their elected leaders to solve the world’s problems of mounting debt, staggering unemployment, global terrorism, and a real threat of war.  As nation states teeter on the brink of bankruptcy with the fear of unchecked anarchy the world is progressively losing its hope. Hopelessness reigns. Continue reading The Blessed Hope

Why Is Life so Difficult?

This article begins a new series that proclaims that God has given us everything we need for all of life and godliness. My heart is grieved over how many people are hurting. I know that God’s heart must also be breaking when he hears the cries of His children. Although at first glance, one can easily blame many things for their struggles and anguish, such as a weak economy, lack of work, or circumstances beyond their control. However, once we take a closer look we soon discover that many of the problems they face are caused by other things not easily recognized or admitted. Before we unearth these causes, it’s necessary to realize that as God’s children His chief concern is the end result. That is, His chief desire beyond anything you experience in this life is to make you into a new creation where the barnacles of the old sin nature fall off and that one day you would stand before Him in heaven as a righteous person in Christ. Continue reading Why Is Life so Difficult?

Why the Clergy Surrendered to Psychiatrists (Part 2)

From time to time I have asked certain individuals to write a guest article to shed light on the abuses of psychiatry and how the church surrendered its biblical authority for the preservation of the soul. Also, to shed light on how the church no longer trust in the sufficiency of Holy Scripture, and the guidance of the Holy Spirit for biblical counseling.

Why the Clergy Surrendered to Psychiatrists (Part 2)

In the year 1812, Dr. Benjamin Rush, one of the original signers of the American Declaration of Independence and official Surgeon General of the Continental Army, published a first of its kind, medical textbook entitled, “Medical Inquiries and Observations upon the Diseases of the Mind.”  It was a book that not only significantly transformed the face and scope of medicine and medical practice, but also it became the standard text, at that time, for medical training in the treatment of, what was previously known as, the maladies of the soul. Continue reading Why the Clergy Surrendered to Psychiatrists (Part 2)

Why the Clergy Surrendered to Psychiatrists (Part 1)

From time to time I have asked certain individuals to write a guest article to shed light on the abuses of psychiatry and how the church surrendered its biblical authority for the preservation of the soul. Also, to shed light on how the church no longer trust in the sufficiency of Holy Scripture, and the guidance of the Holy Spirit for biblical counseling.

Why the Clergy Surrendered to Psychiatrists (Part 1)

Professor of sociology, at the University of Chicago, Dr. Andrew Abbott, in his award winning book, “The System of Professions”, significantly helps us to understand “why” the clergy in the 20th century lost, as well as surrendered, all “cultural” jurisdiction (though not necessarily “ecclesiastical” jurisdiction) over “personal problems” to psychiatrists:

The clergy were in fact the heaviest losers from the creation of the new psychiatric jurisdiction … by the 1920s, the clergy had lost any vestige of cultural jurisdiction over personal problems. No longer were such problems signs of God’s word, or occasions for thinking about ultimate reality. Rather, they were complete and entire problems unto themselves. (Abbott 308, 309). Continue reading Why the Clergy Surrendered to Psychiatrists (Part 1)

Biblical Psychology: Its Rise and Fall

From time to time I have asked certain individuals to write a guest article to shed light on the abuses of psychiatry and how the church surrendered its biblical authority for the preservation of the soul. Also, to shed light on how the church no longer trust in the sufficiency of Holy Scripture, and the guidance of the Holy Spirit for biblical counseling.

Biblical Psychology: Its Rise and Fall

In the year 1855, Franz Julius Delitzsch, one of the premier (or leading) biblical scholars of the 19th century, wrote a first edition, 500 page, Pastoral Theology textbook entitled: A System of Biblical Psychology.  Sigmund Freud was born one year later; Carl Gustav Jung was born 20 years later; and Wilhelm Wundt, who is often considered to be the “principal founder of modern psychology” did not establish his first psychological laboratory for another 23 years.

In his opening chapter of A System of Biblical Psychology, Delitzsch traces the long and valued history of “Psychology” within the life of the Church. His very first (or very opening) sentence makes this proclamation: “Biblical Psychology is no science of yesterday it is one of the oldest sciences of the Church.” (Delitzsch 3)

After making this amazing opening pronouncement, Delitzsch then begins to wonderfully survey the abundance of biblical and theological contributions, made over the many centuries, within this specific doctrinal field of psychological study within the Church, from Justin Martyr and Tertullian, St. Augustine and Gregory the Great, through to St. Thomas Aquinas, the Reformation period and then finally up and to his own time in the 19th century. Continue reading Biblical Psychology: Its Rise and Fall